Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy

November 9, 2018

Louisiana’s regressive tax code is contributing to racial income inequality

Louisiana’s history of institutionalized racism has created barriers to economic prosperity for many people of color in the state. Black households in Louisiana are poorer, on average, than white households. And because of that, they also pay a higher percentage of their income in state and local taxes than white households.Read more...

October 17, 2018

Who pays taxes in Louisiana?

When it comes to paying for government services, Louisiana asks a lot more of those with the fewest resources than it does of its wealthiest citizens, according to new analysis by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy.

Number of the Day

1.2% - Percentage of income from the wealthiest 1 percent of Louisiana households that goes to pay sales and excise taxes. In comparison, 9.2 percent of income from the poorest fifth of the state’s households, who earn $10,500 a year, on average, goes toward sales and excise taxes. (Source: ITEP)
October 17, 2018

Louisiana’s Tax Code is Still Regressive

The wealthiest households in Louisiana continue to pay state and local taxes at a lower rate than those in the middle class and below, according to a new analysis that breaks down the tax rates by income brackets in every state.Read more...

December 15, 2017

The “cliff” gets a little less steep

Louisiana’s budget picture got a little brighter on Thursday, when a state forecasting panel recognized $387 million in new tax revenues for lawmakers to spend over the next 18 months.

Number of the Day

$2,027,000- Louisiana tax contributions from children of immigrants that would be lost if DACA expires before a DREAM Act is passed. (Source: Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy)