Criminal justice reform

December 6, 2018

Minimum wage doesn’t cover the rent

A worker in Louisiana earning the minimum wage would have to work 76 hours per week to afford a one-bedroom rental home, according to a new report from the National Low Income Housing Coalition.  Louisiana does not have a state minimum wage and relies on the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. The federal minimum wage has not increased since 2009 and has lost 12.9 percent of its purchasing power since that time. The report also paints a grim picture for affordable housing across the nation.

Number of the Day

$717 - Monthly “fair market” rent for a 1-bedroom apartment in Louisiana. A worker would need to make $14.07 per hour to make that affordable - which would require 76 hours per week of work at the $7.25 federal minimum wage (Source: National Low Income Housing Coalition)
October 18, 2018

Haggling over teacher pay

Gov. John Bel Edwards and several legislators have said that pay raises for public school teachers and support workers is a top priority in 2019. But the exact size of that raise is likely to be the subject of heated debate in the coming months - a skirmish that started Wednesday when a state task force began reviewing the annual state funding formula for public schools.  

Number of the Day

$12.2 million - Savings this fiscal year as a result of 2017 criminal justice reforms that have reduced Louisiana’s prison population. (Source: AP)
October 17, 2018

Who pays taxes in Louisiana?

When it comes to paying for government services, Louisiana asks a lot more of those with the fewest resources than it does of its wealthiest citizens, according to new analysis by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy.

Number of the Day

1.2% - Percentage of income from the wealthiest 1 percent of Louisiana households that goes to pay sales and excise taxes. In comparison, 9.2 percent of income from the poorest fifth of the state’s households, who earn $10,500 a year, on average, goes toward sales and excise taxes. (Source: ITEP)
September 27, 2018

Louisiana must support young parents

Three out of every 4 children with parents ages 18 to 24 live in poverty in Louisiana. Younger parents typically have fewer savings and lower levels of education, which creates barriers to success and opportunity for their families.

Number of the Day

$23,000 - Median household income for families with young parents, ages 18 to 24, in the U.S. (Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation)