Bryn Stole

December 6, 2018

Minimum wage doesn’t cover the rent

A worker in Louisiana earning the minimum wage would have to work 76 hours per week to afford a one-bedroom rental home, according to a new report from the National Low Income Housing Coalition.  Louisiana does not have a state minimum wage and relies on the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. The federal minimum wage has not increased since 2009 and has lost 12.9 percent of its purchasing power since that time. The report also paints a grim picture for affordable housing across the nation.

Number of the Day

$717 - Monthly “fair market” rent for a 1-bedroom apartment in Louisiana. A worker would need to make $14.07 per hour to make that affordable - which would require 76 hours per week of work at the $7.25 federal minimum wage (Source: National Low Income Housing Coalition)
September 24, 2018

A radical shift on immigration policy

President Donald Trump is proposing to make life much harder for legal immigrants to the United States. A new federal rule - long anticipated but filed late Saturday night - would make it more difficult for people to stay in the country if they use “non-cash” forms of public assistance such as housing vouchers, food benefits or Medicare drug benefits.

Number of the Day

24,197 - Number of people on a waiting list for affordable housing vouchers in New Orleans in 2017-18. Overall, the New Orleans area saw a decrease in availability of affordable housing over the past year (Source: HousingNola, 2018 Report Card)
May 30, 2018

A partial solution is not good enough

The end of the second special session of 2018 is less than a week away, and the only major revenue bill to advance to the Senate is House Bill 27, by Rep. Lance Harris.

Number of the Day

$458,600,000 - Amount that would be raised by all revenue raising measures that are currently working their way through legislative process during the 2018 special session. Louisiana faces a shortfall of $648 million. (Source: LBP)
May 7, 2018

The rush to adjournment

This morning marks the annual ritual when members of the public are invited to testify to the Senate Finance Committee about the state budget.

Number of the Day

3 percent - Amount that local school boards could charge teachers’ unions for collecting dues on their behalf, under legislation backed by business interests. The costs would likely be passed on to teachers. (Source: Will Sentell, The Advocate)