Friday, Nov. 1

Friday, Nov. 1

Government shutdown costs Louisiana nearly $92 million; LBP on WBOK-1230AM radio in New Orleans on Monday to discuss payday lending; A War on the Poor: Paul Krugman; Questions raised about safety in juvenile facilities; and CNSI lawyers claim state tried to delay Greenstein deposition. $91.75 million – The economic loss in Louisiana due to the 16-day partial federal government shutdown (Source: Nola.com)

Government shutdown costs Louisiana nearly $92 million
The 16-day federal government shutdown cost Louisiana $91.75 million. As Nola.com reports, the lost economic productivity was due to the more than 800,000 federal workers in Louisiana who were furloughed during the height of the shutdown. Nationwide, the shutdown drained $24 billion out of the U.S. economy. CNN Money reports that in addition to the furlough of federal workers, economic losses sprung from employees who were furloughed from federal contractors, small businesses that reeled from stalled government contracts and business loans, closed national parks, military families that saw childcare services shuttered, and consumers who reduced their spending.

LBP on WBOK-1230AM radio in New Orleans on Monday to discuss payday lending
LBP policy analyst David Gray will be a guest on WBOK-1230AM radio in New Orleans on Monday to discuss the harmful effects of payday lending in Louisiana. The show airs live at 9 a.m. and listeners will be invited to call in with questions. You can listen online too at WBOK’s website. To learn more about payday lending in Louisiana, visit LBP’s payday lending webpage.

A War on the Poor: Paul Krugman
The Republican Party has launched a war on the poor, Nobel Laureate Paul Krugman writes in The New York Times. “Republican hostility toward the poor and unfortunate has now reached such a fever pitch that the party doesn’t really stand for anything else — and only willfully blind observers can fail to see that reality,” Krugman writes, suggesting two possible reasons: ideology and race. “One reason, the sociologist Daniel Little suggested in a recent essay, is market ideology: If the market is always right, then people who end up poor must deserve to be poor. … [T]here’s also, as Mr. Little says, the stain that won’t go away: race … the Republican base [is] ‘very conscious of being white in a country that is increasingly minority’ — and seeing the social safety net both as something that helps Those People, not people like themselves, and binds the rising nonwhite population to the Democratic Party. And, yes, the Medicaid expansion many states are rejecting would disproportionately have helped poor blacks.”

Questions raised about safety in juvenile facilities
More than a decade after Louisiana overhauled its juvenile justice system, Shante Lockett sat before the state’s Juvenile Justice Reform Act Implementation Commission and told members about how persistent problems in the state’s secure care facilities resulted in her teenage son’s jaw being shattered while he was asleep. Another child struck him with a brick. The tragedy occurred at the Bridge City Youth Center in early October. A high incidence of violence more than a decade ago – which included rapes and beatings – resulted in federal oversight over the state’s juvenile system. That oversight ended seven years ago, but advocates say the state hasn’t done enough to address lingering issues – like placing nonviolent youth in secure care facilities and failing to properly diagnose mentally ill youth.

CNSI lawyers claim state tried to delay Greenstein deposition
A company seeking damages for wrongful termination of a nearly $200 million contract is accusing Gov. Bobby Jindal’s administration of tampering with their case. Client Network Services, Inc. says the state tried to dissuade former health secretary Bruce Greenstein from giving a deposition. “They did whatever they needed to do to convince him not to come,” CNSI attorney Lewis Unglesby told The Advocate. State officials deny the company’s allegations and stand behind their decision to kill the $200 million contract amid a federal investigation into the way it was awarded. Investigators in that case were looking into whether Greenstein used his position to improperly communicate with CNSI, his former employer.

$91.75 million – The economic loss in Louisiana due to the 16-day partial federal government shutdown (Source: Nola.com)